azurekubernetes-sandbox

Initialize your Helm configuration

This cluster has Helm (and its tiller server) already installed, so execute the following command to start using Helm:

$ helm init

Install an application using a Helm Chart

A Helm chart describes a specific version of an application, also known as a “release”. The “release” includes files with Kubernetes-needed resources and files that describe the installation, configuration, usage and license of a chart.

The steps below show, step by step, how to run the following Bitnami applications using Helm charts:

These are just some concrete examples of application releases. Find more Bitnami charts.

By executing the helm install command the application will be deployed on the Kubernetes cluster. You can install more than one chart across the cluster or clusters.

IMPORTANT: If you don’t specify a release name with the *

You can find an example of the installation of Redis using Helm charts below:

$ helm install stable/redis

NOTE: Check the configurable parameters of the Redis chart and their default values at the official Kubernetes GitHub repository.

Once you have the chart installed a “Notes” section will be shown at the bottom of the installation information. It contains important instructions about how to obtain your application’s IP address or credentials. Please check it carefully:

Application deployment on Kubernetes

Find how to install MongoDB, Odoo or WordPress in the examples below:

  • To install the most recent MongoDB release, run the following command:

    $ helm install stable/mongodb
    

    NOTE: Check the configurable parameters of the MongoDB chart and their default values at the official Kubernetes GitHub repository.

  • To install the most recent Odoo release, run the following command:

    $ helm install stable/odoo
    

    NOTE: Check the configurable parameters of the Odoo chart and their default values at the official Kubernetes GitHub repository.

  • To install the most recent WordPress release, run the following command:

    $ helm install stable/wordpress --set mariadb.image=bitnami/mariadb:10.1.21-r0
    

    NOTE: Check the configurable parameters of the WordPress chart and their default values at the official Kubernetes GitHub repository.

Now, you can manage your deployments from the Kubernetes Dashboard. Follow the instructions below to access the Web user interface.

Access the Kubernetes Dashboard

The Kubernetes Dashboard is a Web user interface from which you can manage your clusters in a more simple and digestible way. It provides information on the cluster state, deployments and container resources. You can also check both the credentials and the log error file of each pod within the deployment.

To open the Kubernetes Dashboard, access http://YOUR_IP (replacing the YOUR_IP placeholder with your instance’s address) using a browser. You will be prompted a username and a password. Follow this section to obtain them.

The home screen shows the “Workloads” section. Here you get an overview of the following cluster elements:

  • CPU usage
  • Memory usage
  • Deployments
  • Replica Sets
  • Pods

Access Kubernetes dashboard

From this home screen, you can perform some basic actions such as:

  • Monitoring the status of your deployments and pods.
  • Checking pod and container(s) logs to identify possible errors during the creation of the containers.
  • Finding application credentials.

Monitor the status of Deployments and Pods

Monitor Deployments
  • To check detailed information about the status of your deployments, navigate to the “Workloads -> Deployments” section located on the left menu. It shows a screen with a graphical representation of the CPU and memory usage, as well as a list of all deployments you have in your cluster.

    Access Kubernetes dashboard

  • Click each deployment to obtain detailed information of the selected deployment:

    Access Kubernetes dashboard

Monitoring pods

Pods are the smallest units in Kubernetes deployments. They can contain one or multiple containers (that need to share resources in order to work together). Learn more about pods.

When you click on a pod in the “Workloads -> Pods”, you access the pod list. By selecting a pod, you will see the “Details” section that contains information related to the pod,and a “Containers” section that includes the information related to this pod’s container(s).

Follow these instructions to access pod and container information:

  • To check the status of your deployments in detail, navigate to the “Workloads -> Pods” section located on the left menu. It shows the pod list:

    Access Kubernetes dashboard

  • Click the pod you’d like to access further details for.

    Access Kubernetes dashboard

Check logs

The Kubernetes Dashboard allows you to check the logs of both the pod and any containers belonging to the pod to detect possible errors that might have occurred. To access the logs viewer, follow the steps below:

  • Navigate to the “Workloads -> Pods” section located on the left menu, select the pod you’d like to check from the pod list.

  • In the detail page of the selected pod, you will find a “View logs” link both in the “Details” and “Containers” section. Click the one you want to see:

    Access Kubernetes dashboard

    The logs viewer opens:

    Access Kubernetes dashboard

Find application credentials

The application credentials are shown in the “Notes” section after installing the application chart:

Access Kubernetes dashboard

You can get the application username and password at any time by running the following command:

$ kubectl describe po

Access Kubernetes dashboard

As you can see in the image above, the application password is configured as a secret password. To get it, browse to the Kubernetes Dashboard and follow these instructions:

  • Navigate to the “Config -> Secrets” section located on the left menu.

  • Click the application for which you wish to obtain the credentials.

  • In the “Data” section, click the eye icon to see the password:

Access Kubernetes dashboard

Last modification September 6, 2018